arkenbrony

arkenbrony:

i think tommyoliverblogs might be interested in this, even if you disagree. the thought of twitch as a youtube competitor is something I think we can all hope for

It’s certainly and intersting concept, and one that I’d love to take off. The idea of integrating Amazon purchase referrals into Twitch would be incredible for content reviewers. If I make another Gravity Falls video, for example, I could have referral links to Gravity Falls content, like box sets and figurienes, or, if they tie it into Amazon’s cloud library, get commission for VoD rental purchases of episodes of shows or movies, that can help with content creators making money off their craft.

The biggest issue I see is brand recognition. Twitch is a gaming service, and everyone knows it right now. To make Twitch a general audience rival to YouTube would require a massive rebranding campaign to get the general public aware of its new intentions, and that wouldn’t even guarantee it’d work. The same problems Google faced when trying to get Facebook users to use Google+ could surface here: Once you’re associated with a certain market, you aren’t able to break away from that association.

Regardless, YouTube needs a significant thorn in their side to force them to start shaping up. Amazon certainly has the pocketbook and the backend to make it happen. What they need to deliver on now is a platform that is significantly better for the end user, and significantly more lucrative for the content creator.

We’ll see what happens, I suppose.

sugaryviolet
mysteriouskaos:

mlpartconfessions:

I cannot stress how important a reblog is. Likes are swell and all but simply liking something is not going to help the artist’s audience grow. Liking it but not reblogging it seems like a way of saying you kind of like it but it’s not good enough to reblog. I know this may not be the case for many, but for an artist who struggles with having confidence in their abilities a reblog can go a long way to making them feel like they truly are improving. Reblogging art is like “HEY This is so cool I have to share it”. Simply liking it is like keeping it to yourself instead of sharing the experience with someone who could possibly enjoy it too. Not to mention that some artists count on commissions to make a living. If their audience is not growing they may not be getting the commissions they desperately need because they have not reached new potential customers. If you reblog art you’re really helping the artist grow and, in some cases, survive.
- Submitted by abbyka

This is true, I have seen amazing people like dB promote people like bcpony and help them grow their tumblr/deviantart, rebloging does help people, maybe even I should reblog more, sharing is caring after all.

mysteriouskaos:

mlpartconfessions:

I cannot stress how important a reblog is. Likes are swell and all but simply liking something is not going to help the artist’s audience grow. Liking it but not reblogging it seems like a way of saying you kind of like it but it’s not good enough to reblog. I know this may not be the case for many, but for an artist who struggles with having confidence in their abilities a reblog can go a long way to making them feel like they truly are improving. Reblogging art is like “HEY This is so cool I have to share it”. Simply liking it is like keeping it to yourself instead of sharing the experience with someone who could possibly enjoy it too. Not to mention that some artists count on commissions to make a living. If their audience is not growing they may not be getting the commissions they desperately need because they have not reached new potential customers. If you reblog art you’re really helping the artist grow and, in some cases, survive.

- Submitted by 

This is true, I have seen amazing people like dB promote people like bcpony and help them grow their tumblr/deviantart, rebloging does help people, maybe even I should reblog more, sharing is caring after all.